More than 3,100 pregnant women in Columbia have Zika virus

Zika virus
Rosana Vieira Alves holds her 4-month-old daughter Luana Vieira, who was born with microcephaly, as her daughter Laiane Sophia looks on at their home in Olinda, Brazil, February 2, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

More than 3,100 pregnant Colombian women are infected with the mosquito-borne Zika virus, President Juan Manuel Santos said on Saturday, as the disease continued its spread rapidly across South America.

Brazil is investigating the potential link between Zika infections and more than 4,000 suspected cases of microcephaly, a birth defect marked by an abnormally small head size that can result in developmental problems. Researchers have identified evidence of Zika infection in 17 of these cases, either in the baby or in the mother, but so far have not confirmed that Zika can cause microcephaly.

Till now there have been cases of Zika-linked microcephaly in Colombia, Santos informed. “The government is now uncertain about a previous projection for up to 500 cases of Zika-linked microcephaly, based on data from other countries battling the disease,” added.

Much remains unknown about Zika, for which there is no vaccine. An estimated 80 percent of those infected show no symptoms and those that do have a mild illness, with a fever, rash and red eyes.

There are 25,645 people infected with Zika in Colombia, Santos said during a TV broadcast with health officials. Among them are 3,177 pregnant women.

“The projection is that we could end up having 600,000 cases,” Santos said, adding there could be up to 1,000 cases of Guillain-Barre syndrome, a rare neurological disorder that can weaken the muscles and cause paralysis. Scientists are studying a possible link between the disorder and Zika.

The Colombian government will be working across the country to fight mosquitoes – fumigating and helping families rid their homes of stagnant water, the president said.

Colombia’s Caribbean region, which includes popular tourist destinations Cartagena and Santa Marta, had more than 11,000 cases of the virus, according to the bulletin.

The government has said pregnant women with Zika are eligible to access much-restricted abortion services.

Many women struggle to find abortion providers even when they meet strict legal requirements and illegal abortions are widespread. On Friday, local media reported the first abortion because of Zika infection.

(With Inputs From Reuters)

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