Espionage addict? Head to the refurbished Spy Museum in Washington, D.C.

Espionage addict? Head to the refurbished Spy Museum in Washington, D.C.
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Are you a spy movie addict? Does James Bond, hidden cameras, espionage stories make you all excited? Then, this museum in the U.S is your perfect getaway.
Head to Washington, D.C. and visit the newly opened, refurbished Spy Museum that features the largest collection of international espionage artefacts ever placed on public display.

It is the only public museum in the United States solely dedicated to espionage and the only one in the world to provide a global perspective on an all-but-invisible profession that has shaped history and continues to have a significant impact on world events.

Many of the objects are on public display for the first time and are the works of famous spies and pivotal espionage action. It brings to the forefront strategies and techniques of men and women behind some of the most secretive espionage missions in world history.

Why a Spy Museum?
The museums site says that it is opened to educate the public about espionage and intelligence in an engaging way and to provide a context that fosters understanding of their important role in and impact on current and historic events. The Museum is committed to the apolitical presentation of the history of espionage in order to provide visitors with impartial, accurate information.

The refurbished museum opened for public consumption on 11 May with new exhibits. The new facility is twice the size of the former and new artefacts have been added.

It is an interactive medium conducive both for adults and children.
The goal of the museum is simple – to “place visitors in the shoes of the spies, agents, analysts and world leaders who make life-and-death decisions”.

So what are some things you can expect –
The lipstick pistol used by the KGB during the Cold War.
The essential spy camera, Minox that can take 50 photos without being reloaded. Was used by spies to record secret documents as it has a high resolution.
The Aston Martin DB5, used by James Bond in the 1964 thriller, Goldfinger.
Microdot cameras used by spies.
Hollow coins and secret shoes.
Hear from cyber experts on possible future threats
Test your mettle and espionage skills at interactive stations.

“Spycraft has evolved dramatically since we established the International Spy Museum in 2002,” says Spy Museum founder Milton Maltz. “It’s never been more important for people to understand and appreciate—especially in a democracy—the many roles espionage has played, and continues to play, in shaping our lives, our country, and the world we live in.”

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